Showing posts tagged Pierrot le Fou
The eye, since it can say everything, then deny everything because it is merely casual, is the key piece in the film actor’s game. One only looks what one feels, and what one does not wish to reveal as one’s secret.

Title Sequence #2.

I’ve been thinking about affecting title sequences lately and that line between being too distracting and providing the right tone or prologue, so to speak.  

I thought I would share one of my favorites from Pierrot le Fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard).  Y’all know I have a connection to this film (see here).  

Original music for the film is by Antoine Duhamel

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This is a poster of Jean-Luc Godard’s film, Pierrot le Fou (1965).  I saw this in a class led by Jean-Pierre Gorin (he made films with Godard in the late 1960s) and these were his words on the film: “You will never see anything like this.”  
He was right. Pierrot confused me in all the best ways. I wasn’t even sure what had transpired, yet I couldn’t stop thinking about it. After many viewings, the film comforts me, its strange quality, the very thing that I come back to.
Some years ago, I was fortunate to attend the Telluride Film Festival’s Student Symposium.  To get in to the program, you had to write an essay about the film you would take with you into the future.  Pierrot le Fou is the film I said I’d take with me. Here’s a bit of what I wrote:

"Godard never forgets that an audience is watching…With this acknowledgement of the spectacle, what happens between the camera and the actor becomes even more relevant to the viewer.  Rather than being a conventional romantic relationship between a man and woman, a viewer connects with Karina and Belmondo on various levels, from the personal to the aesthetic to the fantastical.”  

I also figured that a film that confused me might be an interesting thing to have around, especially if it was the only thing to watch. What’s the one film you would take into the future?
Image via iwantobelikearollingstone
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This is a poster of Jean-Luc Godard’s film, Pierrot le Fou (1965).  I saw this in a class led by Jean-Pierre Gorin (he made films with Godard in the late 1960s) and these were his words on the film: “You will never see anything like this.”  

He was right. Pierrot confused me in all the best ways. I wasn’t even sure what had transpired, yet I couldn’t stop thinking about it. After many viewings, the film comforts me, its strange quality, the very thing that I come back to.

Some years ago, I was fortunate to attend the Telluride Film Festival’s Student Symposium.  To get in to the program, you had to write an essay about the film you would take with you into the future.  Pierrot le Fou is the film I said I’d take with me. Here’s a bit of what I wrote:

"Godard never forgets that an audience is watching…With this acknowledgement of the spectacle, what happens between the camera and the actor becomes even more relevant to the viewer.  Rather than being a conventional romantic relationship between a man and woman, a viewer connects with Karina and Belmondo on various levels, from the personal to the aesthetic to the fantastical.”  

I also figured that a film that confused me might be an interesting thing to have around, especially if it was the only thing to watch. What’s the one film you would take into the future?

Image via iwantobelikearollingstone

Follow me on Twitter

To be a fly on the wall…creative disagreement (?) on the set of Pierrot le Fou (1965). Godard and Karina.

To be a fly on the wall…creative disagreement (?) on the set of Pierrot le Fou (1965). Godard and Karina.

(Source: anna--karina, via truthandmovies)